Meet the Researchers

The following section contains detailed biographies for some of our researchers. To see a list of all 324 researchers involved in the OHS, click here.

Researchers

Shabbir M.H. Alibhai

Shabbir M.H. Alibhai is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He is a Physician and Researcher at the University Health Network and Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and a Research Scientist with the Canadian Cancer Society. His research interests are cancer in the elderly, particularly in understanding treatment-related side effects, rational screening and treatment, as well as improving quality of life, fatigue and function in older people with various cancers.
“The mammoth scale of this project and the opportunity to collect a tremendous amount of data is inspiring and creates a fantastic opportunity to study many questions in older adults for all of us who are aging. I’m thrilled to be a small part of this incredible project.”

Johane Allard

Johane Allard is a Gastroenterologist and Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. She is crossed-appointed at the Department of Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Allard is also the Director of the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Nutritional Support Program at the University Health Network. She is the Division Head of Gastroenterology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Dr. Allard is the founding President of the Canadian Society for Clinical Nutrition, now named the Canadian Nutrition Society. She is also Co-Chair of the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force. The aim of the task force is to create a knowledge base and close the gaps between research and practice in the prevention, detection and treatment of malnutrition in Canadians through the continuum of care. Dr. Allard is a clinical investigator, with a research focus in nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Obesity, malnutrition and nutrition support are further areas of interest.
“The Ontario Health Study will provide valuable information about diet and lifestyle factors that can influence the health of our population in the long term. This will help us to determine which problems should be the priority in our future research.”

Eitan Amir

Dr. Eitan Amir is a Medical Oncologist at Princess Margaret Hospital and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto. Dr. Amir’s clinical interests are the treatment of breast cancer and toxicities of anti-cancer drugs. His academic interests include meta-analysis and large database population-based studies. Dr. Amir obtained his medical degree from the University of Manchester and trained in medical oncology at the Christie Hospital, Manchester. He has also completed a PhD in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Amir has authored more than 60 peer-reviewed publications as well as numerous published abstracts and book chapters.
"Results of clinical trials are informative, but often cannot be generalized to the general population as a whole. The Ontario Health Study will allow us to investigate how effective our interventions are in a normal population."

Danielle Andrade

Danielle Andrade is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neurology at the University of Toronto. She is cross-appointed to The Hospital for Sick Children, where she is the Director of the Epilepsy Transition Program. As a neurologist specialized in the areas of epilepsy and genetics, Dr. Andrade is the founder of the first Adult Epilepsy Genetics Program in Ontario. Dr. Andrade’s research interests are in the area of genetic causes of epilepsies, familial forms of epilepsy and genotype-phenotype correlations in adults.
 

Nancy Baxter

Nancy Baxter is a Colorectal Surgeon and a Clinical Epidemiologist at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. Dr. Baxter is an Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery and Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. She holds the Cancer Care Ontario Health Services Research Chair and is a scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute. Her research interests include surgical outcomes, health services research methodology and health related quality of life, and she has extensive experience evaluating patterns and factors that influence cancer care in the population.
 

Anthony Bella

Anthony Bella is the Greta and John Hansen Chair in Men’s Health Research, Assistant Professor of Urology and Director of Basic Urologic Research at the University of Ottawa, and Associate Scientist (Neuroscience) at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa. Dr. Bella’s primary urologic clinical interests are management of post-prostate cancer treatment complications and complex reconstructive urogenital surgeries. From a men’s health standpoint, his interests focus on aiding in the formation of a national Men’s Health Strategy for Canada, the use of urologic non-specific primary care health encounters to drive preventative men’s health, and delineation of non-traditional markers such as erectile dysfunction for cardiovascular health.
"The OHS offers an almost-unprecedented opportunity to impact health care across a broad range of disease processes, on a Canadian and truly international level. Prevention, treatment, knowledge – every man, woman and child has the potential to benefit from this research program."

Sasha Bernatsky

Sasha Bernatsky is a Rheumatologist and Clinical Epidemiologist with an interest in burden of disease and long-term outcomes in chronic rheumatic disease. Dr. Bernatsky is an Associate Professor at McGill University, Department of Medicine, and a Clinical Scientist in the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre.
“The Ontario Health Study promises to be a very important resource and will be a model for chronic disease epidemiology, surveillance and outcomes research in Canada.”

Arlene S. Bierman

Arlene Bierman is a general internist, geriatrician and the inaugural holder of Echo’s Ontario Women’s Health Council Chair in Women’s Health. She is an Associate Professor in the Lawrence F. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing; and of Health Policy, Evaluation and Management; and Medicine at the University of Toronto. As well, Dr. Bierman is a Senior Scientist in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael's Hospital. She is the Principal Investigator for the POWER study, helping policymakers and health care providers to improve health and reduce health inequities in Ontario. Dr. Bierman was a Senior Research Physician in the Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research at the U.S. Agency for Health Care Research and Quality. She has served as a Deputy Editor of the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Dr. Bierman was Director of the Primary Care Internal Medicine residency program and Director of the Department of Ambulatory Care at Elmhurst Hospital Center in New York and on the faculty of the departments of Internal Medicine and Community and Preventive Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.
 

Nicholas Birkett

Nick Birkett is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the University of Ottawa and the Associate Director (epidemiology) for the McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment. He has been at the University of Ottawa for over 20 years. His personal interests are in epidemiological methodology and the application of systems concepts to the understanding of cancer causation. He is working with prostate and oesophageal cancer.
"The OHS is a great resource for Ontario. It will provide the base for exciting research for many years to come, and will lead to improvements in the prevention and treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. But, all of this positive impact depends on the generosity and support of the people of Ontario. Many thanks to all."

Catherine Birt

Catherine Birt is a glaucoma specialist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and an Associate Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine. Her research interests are centered on clinical glaucoma care, diagnosis and treatment.
 

Sandra Black

Sandra Black holds the inaugural Brill Chair in Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. She received her medical and neurological training at the University of Toronto, completed postdoctoral research at the University of Western Ontario in Behavioural Neurology and Stroke, and pursued graduate work in the History and Philosophy of Science at Oxford University. She directs the Brain Sciences Research Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute, and is a Senior Scientist at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest. She is Medical Director of the Regional Stroke Centre for N&E GTA and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Site Director for the Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery. She was Head of Neurology at Sunnybrook (1995-2006) and currently directs the LC Campbell Cognitive Neurology Research Unit. Her research interests include stroke recovery and vascular cognitive impairment, diagnosis of dementia and the use of neuroimaging to study brain-behaviour relationships. She has published over 350 papers and is actively engaged in clinical trials of stroke and stroke recovery, Alzheimer’s and vascular cognitive impairment.
“The Ontario Health Study has the potential to help us better understand the early predictors of Alzheimer’s disease and cerebrovascular disease, both dreaded disorders that sabotage quality of life in increasing numbers in our aging population, and pose a significant threat to our health-care system. Comprehensive population studies, especially of those coming to OHS assessment centres, can provide crucial longitudinal insights that can help us identify new biomarkers and new targets for intervention.”

Douglas Bradley

Douglas Bradley is a Respirologist, a Professor of Medicine and Department Division Director of Respirology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Bradley also serves as Director for the Sleep Research Laboratory at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the Centre for Sleep Health and Research at the Toronto General Hospital of the University Health Network. He obtained his MD degree at the University of Alberta. His clinical and research work focuses on the causes and cardiovascular consequences of sleep apnea and of its treatment on cardiovascular endpoints, especially in patients with co-existing heart failure, hypertension and stroke. He holds peer-reviewed grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, MaRS Innovation and the Ontario Centres of Excellence and has published over 190 papers and book chapters on sleep apnea and related topics. Presently, he is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and of the Editorial Board of SLEEP and is a former Associate Editor of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Bradley is highly sought as a speaker on sleep apnea, its causes and cardiovascular consequences around the world.
 

Rodney Breau

Rodney Breau is a Surgical Oncologist at The Ottawa Hospital and Assistant Professor of Urology at the University of Ottawa. He completed his Urologic Oncology and Robotic Surgery Fellowship at Mayo Clinic and a Masters of Science in Clinical Research from Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. He is a founding member of the International Evidence Based Urology Group and serves on the American Urological Association steering committee for Evidence Based Reviews in Urology. He is an Associate Scientist with the Ottawa Health Research Institute and has specific interest in population-based observational studies and clinical trials. He is a member of the Society of Urologic Oncology and is interested in prostate, kidney and bladder cancer research.
“The Ontario Health Study is a unique opportunity for us to learn about ourselves. This study will allow us to determine predictors of health, patterns of disease, and areas for further study.”

Rob Campbell

Rob Campbell is a Clinician-Scientist and Director of the Postgraduate Residency Training Program in the Department of Ophthalmology at Queen’s University. Dr. Campbell studied medicine and completed his residency in ophthalmology at the University of Ottawa, where he was gold medallist and valedictorian. Dr. Campbell undertook post-residency fellowship training in glaucoma surgery at the University of Toronto and cornea surgery at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, England. Dr. Campbell is an Adjunct Scientist with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and leads a CIHR-funded research program focused on the assessment of eye and vision health- care quality, access and safety.
“Canada has an outstanding history of scientific achievement, and the commitment of Canadians to providing high-quality health care across our population is a defining characteristic. The OHS is an important step in both of these ventures.”

Chi-Ming Chow

Dr. Chi-Ming Chow is an attending Staff Cardiologist at St. Michael’s Hospital. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, University of Toronto. He has an undergraduate degree in computer science from Brown University. He completed his Doctor of Medicine (1990) at Montréal’s McGill University and a Masters of Science in Epidemiology at McGill University. Dr. Chow completed his training in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Cardiology at McGill University. He then pursued his clinical and research echocardiography fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, before joining the Division of Cardiology at St. Michael’s Hospital in 2001. Clinically he specializes in non-invasive cardiac imaging, in particular echocardiography and stress echocardiography. He is the Director of the Echocardiography and Vascular Ultrasound Laboratory at St. Michael's Hospital. He also speaks Cantonese and Mandarin fluently. He currently takes care of many GTA Chinese speaking patients in his practice. His academic interests include medical informatics and he has authored many popular medical education software programs. These programs are used by healthcare professionals and students worldwide. His other current areas of research include ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease, new technologies in non-invasive imaging and using medical informatics to improve patient care. Dr. Chow has won several local and national teaching awards to recognize his teaching and innovation in medical education. He has authored multiple peer-reviewed journals and presented in local, national and international scientific meetings. He is also a regular contributor to the Canadian Journal CME as a cardiology consultant. He is currently an advisory board member and a media spokesperson for the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario; and the Vice-President of the Chinese Canadian Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. He participates actively in health promotion and research among ethnic Chinese.
 

Sean Cleary

Sean Cleary is a surgeon-scientist at the University Health Network and a Research Associate at the Prosserman Centre for Health Research in the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute. In addition to his surgical training, Dr. Cleary completed a Masters degree in Cancer Genetics and a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology at the University of Toronto. His research interests are focused on the genetic epidemiology of liver, pancreas and colorectal cancer, while his clinical practice is in the surgical management of these malignancies.
"The OHS represents a tremendous opportunity for us to understand some of the complex environmental and genetic causes behind difficult diseases such as cancer. The people of Ontario have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make a major contribution to our understanding of so many diseases and it is an honour to be involved in such an amazing project."

Curtis Cooper

Curtis Cooper is an Associate Professor with the University of Ottawa, Infectious Diseases Consultant with the Ottawa Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases, Clinical Researcher with the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and Ontario HIV Treatment Network Career Scientist. Dr. Cooper’s research activities encompass HIV, viral hepatitis, and vaccine/vaccine adjuvant development with a focus on influenza and hepatitis B. He obtained his MD from the University of Saskatchewan and trained at the University of Manitoba for Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. His work is focused on the development of new therapeutic agents and the delivery of treatment that maximizes safety, adherence and safety; particularly in the development of new HCV therapeutics and immunization in immune compromised populations. Dr. Cooper also serves as Treasurer of the Canadian Association for HIV Researchers in addition to numerous other research groups and committees including the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) and Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (AMMI) Guidelines Committee.
 

Pierre Côté

Pierre Côté has a PhD in epidemiology and is an Associate Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Dr. Côté is also a Scientist in the Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research at the Toronto Western Research Institute. His primary research interests include the burden and determinants of disability related to musculoskeletal disorders.
"The richness of the data collected in the OHS will provide us with a unique opportunity to study the health of Ontarians. Ultimately, it may help us prevent disability and improve the health of our population."

Michelle Cotterchio

Michelle Cotterchio is a Scientist at Cancer Care Ontario and Associate Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Dr. Cotterchio’s research program focuses on the etiology of cancer – in particular breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancer. The majority of her research is focused on modifiable risk factors of breast and colorectal cancer, as well as the interaction with genetic factors. Dr. Cotterchio currently holds molecular epidemiology research grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute. She serves as Co-Principal Investigator on the Ontario Familial Colon Cancer Registry, an international consortium funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute for the past decade.
“The OHS is an important initiative that has the potential to advance knowledge regarding the prevention of many chronic diseases.”

Natasha Crowcroft

Natasha Crowcroft is Director of Surveillance and Epidemiology at Public Health Ontario. This scientific program is responsible for Provincial infectious disease surveillance as well as supporting surveillance and epidemiology in Environmental and Occupational Health, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, Emergency Management and for the Public Health Laboratories. A public health physician, she has a broad background in clinical medicine, microbiology and field epidemiology, and an extensive portfolio of research, training, policy and public health service. She has worked internationally and as an advisor to the World Health Organization, Geneva. During her decade with the United Kingdom’s Health Protection Agency, she was a national expert in immunization for the U.K., ran several national surveillance systems and conducted research studies in a number of areas, including pertussis and encephalitis. She moved to Canada in 2007, where she is a member of the Canadian National Advisory Committee on Immunization and Ontario’s Provincial Infectious Disease Advisory Committee on Immunization. She is also a member of the Pan American Health Organization’s International Expert Committee on the elimination of measles, rubella and congenital rubella syndrome from the Americas.
 

Sulan Dai

Sulan Dai received her MD from the Shanghai Medical University and PhD in Health Geography from the University of Victoria. After practicing medicine in teaching hospitals for over 10 years, she now specializes in chronic disease surveillance and prevention at the Public Health Agency of Canada. She serves as Senior Epidemiologist, leading the Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Unit in the Chronic Disease Surveillance & Monitoring Division. Her research interests focus on cardiovascular disease and diabetes incidence and prevalence and mortality in Canada, as well as their comorbidities and risk factors.
"It is a great opportunity to be part of the Ontario Health Study team. The OHS will add value to the cardiovascular disease research fields at the national level and fill data gaps in Canada’s cardiovascular disease surveillance system."

Patrick Davidson

Patrick Davidson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Psychology and the Behavioural Neuroscience program at the University of Ottawa where he is also a Scientist at the Élisabeth Bruyère Research Institute and an Associate Member of the Centre for Stroke Recovery. His primary research interests include human memory and cognition.
"OHS is an ambitious undertaking. Few other regions in the world have the population willing and able, and the critical mass of scientists and resources needed to carry it out successfully."

Anna Day

Anna Day is a Respirologist and Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. She is Chair of Continuing Education for the Division of Respirology and Director of the Gender and Airways Program at Women’s College Hospital. Dr. Day served as Physician-in-Chief at Women’s College Hospital and then Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre from 1991 to 1999 and was founding Board Chair of the Centre for Research in Women’s Health. Her clinical research is in the area of gender and pulmonary health, with a focus on both the psychosocial and biological factors contributing to gender differences in asthma and smoking-related pulmonary disease.
“This study provides us with a unique opportunity to utilize a ‘gender lens’ in studying the impact of heredity, environment and life choices on the health of our population, particularly in the area of smoking-related pulmonary disease.”

Shelley Deeks

Dr. Shelley Deeks is the Associate Director of Surveillance and Epidemiology at Public Health Ontario and an Assistant Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. She is Chair of the World Health Organization’s Immunization Practices Advisory Committee and the Ontario HPV Prevention Evaluation Committee, as well as the Scientific Lead for Ontario’s Provincial Infectious Disease Advisory Committee on Immunization. Dr. Deeks holds fellowships in Public Health at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine. Her current areas of focus are vaccines, vaccine program evaluation and vaccine preventable disease outbreak management and response.
 

Craig Earle

Craig Earle is a medical oncologist at Sunnybrook’s Odette Cancer Centre, a Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto, a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Director of Health Services Research for Cancer Care Ontario and the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. Dr. Earle spent 10 years at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. While there, he was the founding Director of the Lance Armstrong Foundation Adult Survivorship Clinic at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His personal research interests focus on evaluating and improving the quality of care received by patients with advanced cancer and cancer survivors.
“The OHS has the potential to be one of the best platforms for medical research in the world, allowing discoveries ranging from the causes of disease to what the patient experience is like after treatment. The more people that participate, the more valuable it will be, so I encourage everyone who is eligible to sign up!”

Khaled El Emam

Khaled El Emam is an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, and the School of Information Technology and Engineering, a Senior Investigator at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute and a Canada Research Chair in Electronic Health Information at the University of Ottawa. Prior to this, Dr. El Emam was a Senior Research Officer at the National Research Council of Canada and he headed up the Quantitative Methods Group at the Fraunhofer Institute in Kaiserslautern, Germany. His main area of research is data sharing and the privacy of personal health information, which includes developing techniques for secure anonymization of health information, assessing re-identification risk of health datasets and developing secure multi-party computation protocols for distributed surveillance and data analysis.
 

Susan J. Elliot

Dr. Susan J. Elliott is the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences at the University of Waterloo and a Professor of Public Health and Health Systems, cross-appointed to Geography and Environmental Management. She completed her PhD in Medical Geography and has published extensively in a range of health-related areas, including the geographies of health promotion and individual and community level impacts of a range of environmental exposures. Her primary research focus is on relationships between environment and health. She is currently a Co-theme Leader in AllerGen, a Canadian National Centre of Excellence on allergies and asthma in the environment and an adjunct professor with the United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment & Health, where she works in the area of the water health nexus in East Africa. She is currently the Scientific Leader for the Sandbox Project, which is focused on improving health outcomes with respect to injury prevention, obesity, mental health and the environment in response to the lack of health indicators for children and youth in Canada.
“Canada lost a great man in Dr. Fraser Mustard, the man who taught us that the health of populations is an essential area of study and impact. The OHS has the potential to be a flagship project in this area.”

Katya Feder

Katya Feder has a PhD in Rehabilitation Science and a clinical background as a pediatric occupational therapist. She is an Adjunct Professor at the School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa and an Adjunct Investigator at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute. Dr. Feder has been the recipient of several CIHR awards for doctoral and postdoctoral research in vision science and has recently completed a three-year NSERC Visiting Fellowship at Health Canada where she was the lead investigator on a pilot study which examined hearing and MP3 player user listening habits in children and adolescents, as well as involved in writing the proposal, survey content/protocol for the Hearing Component of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.
"The OHS is an exciting project and will provide much needed information about many health outcomes including vision and hearing health. This data will help guide health professionals, public health officials, policy makers and researchers as to what our next steps should be with regards to health promotion and prevention of disability."

Aaron Fenster

Aaron Fenster received his PhD from the Department of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto in 1976. His went on to work at the university’s Department of Radiology and Medical Biophysics and as the Director of the Radiological Research laboratories of the Department of Radiology. In 1987, Dr. Fenster moved to London, Ont., and became a Scientist and founding Director of the Imaging Research Laboratories at the Robarts Research Institute and Professor at The University of Western Ontario (UWO) in Radiology and Medical Biophysics. He is the founder and Associate Director of the Biomedical Engineering interdisciplinary graduate program at UWO and Chair of the basic Science Division of the Department of Medical Imaging. He holds a Canada Research Chair-Tier 1 in Biomedical Engineering and is the recipient of the 2007 Premier’s Award for Innovative Leadership. He is the first recipient of the Premier’s (Ontario) Discovery Award for Innovation and Leadership (2007), the Hellmuth Prize for Achievement in Research at the UWO (2008) and the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists (COMP) Gold Medal Award (2010). Dr. Fenster’s group has focused on the development of 3D ultrasound imaging with diagnostic and surgical/therapeutic cancer applications. His research has resulted in 37 patents (27 awarded and 10 pending).
 

Thomas F. Freddo

Thomas Freddo is a Professor of Ophthalmology and Pathology at Boston University School of Medicine, where he also served as Director of the Eye Pathology Service and maintained a hospital-based practice of optometry. He directed an NIH-funded research program in anterior uveitis and glaucoma for more than 20 years. Dr. Freddo is the current President of the International Society for Eye Research. He has won numerous teaching awards and was the 1992 recipient of the Glenn A. Fry Award for excellence in eye/vision research. He has received honorary doctorates from the State University of New York and the Université de Montréal and continues his glaucoma research through his continuing collaborations at Boston University.
 

Amit Garg

Amit Garg is a Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of Western Ontario. He is the Scientific Director of ICES@Western and a practicing Nephrologist at the London Health Sciences Centre. Dr. Garg conducts clinical and health services research to improve health outcomes for patients with kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis or a kidney transplant. One of his goals is to improve the efficiency by which renal care is delivered. Dr. Garg holds a Clinician Scientist Award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. His key research interests include quality and improvement in renal care, population renal surveillance and outcomes of living kidney donation.
“The Ontario Health Study provides an important and unique opportunity to understand the factors that cause kidneys to fail, so that we reduce the incidence of kidney failure or prevent it all together.”

Ophira Ginsburg

Ophira Ginsburg is a medical oncologist, Adjunct Scientist at Women’s College Research Institute and Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Medicine and Dalla Lana School of Public Health. In 2007, she became Medical Director of the Cancer Prevention and Screening Program and Director of Familial Oncology for the Central East Regional Cancer Program. Her research is grounded in the principles of global health oncology: to find innovative, cost-effective solutions to breast cancer care and control in low-resource settings. Since 2004, Dr. Ginsburg has volunteered with a US-based non-profit organization, the International Breast Cancer Research Foundation, where she travels to Vietnam and Bangladesh and researches, teaches and assists local physicians in treating women with breast cancer. In Canada, her community-based research engages newcomers and immigrants to understand and overcome barriers to breast care for women at home and abroad.
"I am delighted to take part in this important effort and encourage everyone to sign up. The OHS can teach us all a great deal about how to improve the health of Ontarians and can shed light on health equity, increasingly important in our interconnected world."

Keith Gordon

Keith Gordon is Vice President Research at the CNIB. Prior to joining CNIB in 2007, he spent more than 30 years in the ophthalmic industry, where he was responsible for a wide range of research and scientific activities. He is responsible for managing the research operations of CNIB, and is committed to utilizing research to ensure ongoing, evidence-based vision rehabilitation services at CNIB and the maintenance of service quality. Dr Gordon’s primary research interests lie in the area of ophthalmic epidemiology. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Toronto.
 

Effie Gournis

Effie Gournis is a Manager of the Communicable Disease Surveillance Unit at Toronto Public Health and holds an Assistant Professor appointment in the Epidemiology division at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health. She is a member of the Provincial Infectious Disease Advisory Committee focused on surveillance issues. She has worked in TB Epidemiology with San Francisco's Department of Public Health, malaria control and prevention with the Pasteur Institute, food-borne illness surveillance with the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, and as an HIV/AIDS advisor for an advocacy program in New York state.
"To understand health risks through a long-term population-based lens for those living in Ontario is a remarkable opportunity for both the academic community and the ultimate benefactor – the public."

Sherry Grace

Sherry Grace holds a PhD in applied research, and serves as an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Health at York University. As well, Dr. Grace is Director of Research at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Prevention Program, and a Scientist at the Toronto General Research Institute. She serves as vice-chair of the OHS Psychosocial Health working group. Her research interests revolve around cardiac rehabilitation and cardiac psychology.
“Being a part of this study is so exciting – we have an incredible opportunity to better understand how to optimize psychosocial health and well-being, and also to understand what determines our psychosocial health. Our working group has really laid the groundwork so that in the coming years we will know so much more about not only emotional distress, but life satisfaction and well-being.”

Cheryl Grady

After receiving her graduate training in experimental psychology at Boston University, Cheryl Grady went on to the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland. She is a Senior Scientist at Toronto’s Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest, and was the Assistant Director of the Institute from 2004 to 2010. She is a Professor in the departments of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Toronto, and holds a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Neurocognitive Aging. She has been awarded the Justine and Yves Sergent Award for Women in Neuroscience and was the recipient of the Donald Stuss Award for Research Excellence. Dr. Grady’s research focuses on the use of brain imaging to explore the functional and structural changes that occur in aging and how these relate to changes in behaviour. Her lab is exploring aspects of brain aging that may be of fundamental importance to our understanding of aging. These include age differences in large-scale functional connectivity of brain networks, the influence of lifelong experience (such as bilingualism) on brain structure/function, and variability of brain activity. The goal is to understand how cognition is altered, or maintained, during the aging process, and ultimately to use this knowledge to improve rehabilitation interventions in the elderly.
"The Ontario Health Study is important because it will provide a unique and extremely valuable dataset with health information on a large number and diverse spectrum of adults in the province. Aging affects all of the body’s systems, including the brain, so our knowledge of aging will be greatly expanded when we are able to combine data across all the aspects tapped by the OHS into a comprehensive picture of what it’s like to be an older adult."

Barry Greenberg

Barry Greenberg co-directs the Toronto Dementia Research Alliance at University Health Network (UHN) as Director of Strategy, a consortium involving academic research and the five memory clinics at hospitals affiliated with the University of Toronto to create a citywide dementia research centre. Dr. Greenberg has been involved in Alzheimer’s disease research and drug discovery since 1985. He has held a series of positions in the U.S., Sweden and Canada within the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Dr. Greenberg was the leader of a drug discovery project at AstraZeneca through lead optimization. Before joining UHN, he was Senior Director of Pharmacology at Neurochem. Dr. Greenberg possesses a significant background in most aspects of the drug discovery process in neurological disease, with expertise ranging from target identification and validation through preclinical and clinical development. He has a strong international network in the Alzheimer field, including industry, academia, government and the voluntary sector, plus previous involvement in multi-sector consortia. He has authored or co-authored 70 articles in peer-reviewed journals and 19 book chapters and reviews.
 

David A. Grimes

David Grimes is the Director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Clinic at The Ottawa Hospital. He is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Ottawa and an Associate Scientist at the Ottawa Health Research Institute. Dr. Grimes research interests are in the identification of gene mutations that cause or contribute to the development of Parkinson’s disease and other disorders that cause involuntary movements. His major clinical interests are in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of movement disorders with an emphasis on Parkinson’s disease and dystonia as well as exploring novel treatments.
"Many of medicines greatest discoveries have come from clues gained by assessing large groups of individuals prior to their developing a specific disease. The OHS will provide the platform to study a broad range of health issues to lead the way for the next generation of medical breakthroughs."

Eva Grunfeld

Eva Grunfeld is a Physician Scientist with the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Health Services Research Program, and Director of the Knowledge Translation Research Network. She is the Giblon Professor and Director of Family Medicine Research at the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto. Dr. Grunfeld founded and directed the Cancer Outcomes Research Program at Cancer Care Nova Scotia and Dalhousie University. She obtained her medical degree from McMaster University and doctoral degree in cancer epidemiology from Oxford University. Dr. Grunfeld is internationally recognized for her research on cancer follow-up and survivorship. The clinical trials she has conducted on cancer follow-up care have influenced clinical practice guidelines internationally. Dr. Grunfeld holds many peer-review grants as a Principal Investigator and has served on various committees to further the goals of cancer control in Canada and internationally.
 

Stewart B. Harris

Stewart B. Harris is a Professor at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario. He holds the Canadian Diabetes Association Chair in Diabetes Management as well as the Ian McWhinney Chair of Family Medicine Studies. Dr. Harris has appointments in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Department of Family Medicine. With a research focus in Type 2 diabetes, Dr. Harris has been published extensively and has served as a board member of numerous national and provincial diabetes-related organizations, including chairing the 2003 Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guidelines.
“At a time when chronic diseases such as diabetes have been recognized as leading causes of death, the Ontario Health Study offers an unprecedented opportunity to gain an understanding of key risk factors and association of the largest population cohort ever studied. It is a privilege to be a scientific member contributing to this exciting endeavour.”

Bob Harrison

Bob Harrison is Professor and Director of Research in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Toronto. He is also a Senior Scientist in Neuroscience and Mental Health at the Hospital for Sick Children. Dr. Harrison has basic training in biological sciences, with doctoral degrees in auditory neuroscience from universities in the U.K. He worked with scientists in England, France and the Netherlands before moving to Canada. His research ranges from basic laboratory science to clinically applied projects in the area of hearing loss and communication disorders. His research philosophy is to take new basic science findings and apply them to promote wellness and improved health care.
"The Ontario Health Study is important. At the micro "self interest" level, I want to know more about how many Canadians have hearing and communication problems. I want to know how many people develop hearing loss, and trace the causes. We need this information for planning education strategies for prevention, as well as health-care resources for treatment and habilitation. At the macro level, these questions are important for all aspects of health care and the quality of life of our society."

Ann Heesters

Ann Heesters is the Associate Director of Ethics at the University Health Network and a member of the University of Toronto’s Joint Centre for Bioethics. After a three-year internship in ethics (jointly funded by Hamilton Health Sciences and the Department of Philosophy at McMaster University), she became the first full-time ethicist at Atlantic Health Sciences Corporation in Saint John, N.B. Heesters subsequently became the Director of Ethics of The Ottawa Hospital. She is now Vice-Chair of Toronto Rehab’s Research Ethics Board, serves on the executive of the Canadian Bioethics Society, and is a founding member of PHEEP (Practicing Healthcare Ethicists Exploring Professionalization).
 

Jeffrey Hoch

Jeffrey Hoch received his PhD in health economics. An award-winning teacher, Dr. Hoch has taught Health Economics classes in Canada and internationally. In 2007, he was selected to develop and direct the Pharmacoeconomics Research Unit at Cancer Care Ontario. As Director of the unit, Dr. Hoch has pursued research making health economics more useful to decision makers. In 2009, Dr. Hoch became the co-Director of the Canadian Centre for Applied Research in Cancer Control (ARCC).
“Cancer is a terrible disease and we must meet the challenge in a smart, efficient way. Applied research in cancer control is very important because it can help millions of people at a time.”

William Hodge

As an Ophthalmologist, Professor and Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Western Ontario, Dr. Hodge assumed the role of Scientific Director of the Vision Team in late 2010. He is a clinical epidemiologist whose research work has spanned the areas of observational research, clinical trials and knowledge synthesis. Prior to this, Dr. Hodge was on faculty at the University of Ottawa Eye Institute for 12 years. He did his medical and ophthalmology training at McGill University and University of California, San Francisco. He did his Clinical Epidemiology training at UC Berkeley and at McGill University.
“The Ontario Health Study will be the first Canadian prospective cohort study featuring vision as a major component. Hence the Ontario vision community has been mobilized, including clinical ophthalmologists, clinical optometrists, researchers, vision NGOs and international advisors. It promises to be a study with great impact for Canadians and for the vision community internationally.”

Bernard Hurley

Bernard R. Hurley is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Residency Program Director at the University of Ottawa as well as the fellowship Program Director for the University of Ottawa Eye Institute. Dr. Hurley completed his post-graduate medical education at the prestigious Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The twice-awarded Outstanding Fellow recipient has written several book chapters and has authored or co-authored many peer-reviewed publications concerning the treatment of choroidal neovascularization and diabetic retinopathy.
"The OHS is a unique opportunity to better understand many important diseases that affect the lives of so many of our loved ones right here in Ontario. The more people that participate, the more significant the results will be, so I would encourage as many people as possible to become involved."

Cindy M.L. Hutnik

Cindy M.L. Hutnik completed doctorate work at the National Research Council of Canada prior to her medical training at the University of Ottawa. This was followed by ophthalmic training at the University of Western Ontario and the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Hutnik has a full-time clinical glaucoma practice at the Ivey Eye Institute in London, Ontario, where she is involved in the clinical training of residents and medical students. She is a member of the international Tear Film and Ocular Surface committee of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and is a member of a number of editorial boards. She is also an Advisory Board member of a number of major pharmaceutical companies. Dr. Hutnik is Medical Coordinator of the ophthalmic basic science laboratory at the Lawson Health Research Institute in London. Dr. Hutnik’s research administrative roles include membership on the Board of Directors of the Lawson Health Research Institute and Chair of Research in the Department of Ophthalmology.
“Risk factor analysis plays a key role in our decision to offer treatment to patients. Treatments have risks and benefits that have to be carefully considered. Although we know many risk factors for some diseases, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge, and hence understanding of, human diseases. The Ontario Health Study will provide a rich database to better understand the impact of known risk factors as well as potentially to reveal new important risk factors in Canadian health and disease.”

Jane Irvine

Jane Irvine holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at York University and is a research affiliate in the Behavioural Sciences & Health Division of the Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network. She also holds an academic appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Dr. Irvine is the Chair of the OHS Psychosocial and Mental Health Working Group. Her research focuses on the bio-behavioural mechanisms underlying the effects of negative emotions and psychological stress on the cardiovascular system. She has pioneered the development of cognitive-behavioural interventions for promoting health behaviour change (e.g., smoking cessation, enhancing adherence to health behavior change) and adaptation to illness (e.g., treatment of depression following an acute coronary event).
"I am very excited to participate as a researcher and as a research participant in this very important study. The OHS provides a unique opportunity to study how factors such as genetics, health behaviours, psychosocial stress and environmental toxins interact to influence the development of specific diseases and health outcomes."

Trevor Jamieson

A former computer scientist and General Internist at St. Michael’s Hospital, Trevor Jamieson is currently pursuing a Master’s in Biomedical Informatics through the Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland. His interests are primarily in the use of informatics in day-to-day clinical decisions, in particular how decision support and user interfaces can augment the patient care process, and the use of communications technologies to improve the collaboration in patient-care teams.
“I believe the future of medical decision making, and the movement towards more personalized patient-centered care plans, hinges on our ability to intelligently gather data, store it and retrieve it. This is important not just for the purposes of broad-scale population-based research, but, ultimately, for the purposes of ‘real-time’ decision-making in the hopes of constructing a plan tailored to the patient given everything we know about past successes, failures and trends, both in that person and in people like them. The OHS is a great step in that direction.”

Kathleen Kerr

Kathleen Kerr is a staff physician and research liaison at the Environmental Health Clinic at Women’s College Hospital as well as a lecturer in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto. She also has a community practice with a special interest in environmental aspects of health, including long term health effects of environmental exposures and persistent body burdens, chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivity and functional assessment tools in chronic complex conditions. Her research interests include health effects of pesticides, lead and other heavy metals and methods to enhance elimination of xenobiotics. Dr. Kerr is currently working on an update of the 2004 systematic review of the health effects of pesticides and is co-investigator for a project entitled Gulf War Illness – Evaluation of an Innovative Detoxification Program.
"The OHS is very comprehensive in terms of including environmental exposures."

David Klein

David J. Klein is a Staff Physician at St. Michael’s Hospital in Critical Care Medicine and Sleep Medicine. He is also a scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Head of Business Strategy and Medical Affairs for the Applied Health Research Center. Dr. Klein is board certified in Internal Medicine, Sleep Medicine and Critical Care Medicine. He is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. His research interests include clinical and translational research in biomarker development, and treatment of sepsis. He has published and served as faculty at major international congresses.
I am proud to be part of such an important project that has the potential to have transformative impact on the health of Canadians. The Applied Health Research Center and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute are strong partners of the Ontario Health Study.

Julia Knight

Julia Knight, PhD, is a senior investigator in the Prosserman Centre for Health Research at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital and an Associate Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. She is an epidemiologist by training and her research program has largely focused on understanding the genetic and non-genetic causes of cancer, particularly breast cancer, with a view to disease prevention. Dr. Knight is also interested in the health effects of vitamin D and identifying factors that influence vitamin D levels. Additional areas of interest include melatonin and circadian disruption, alcohol, hormones and body composition. A particular area of interest is the study of early events related to the development of breast cancer and the development of intermediate endpoints in order to study these events.
"A big study like this is important to help us really understand why some people are healthy and others are not and will help us improve health for all. The more people participate, the better we will be able to do this."

Nancy Krieger

Nancy Kreiger is the Director of Research and a Senior Scientist in Prevention and Cancer Control at Cancer Care Ontario. She is also a full professor and the Head of the Division of Epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto and also holds appointments in the Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Dr. Kreiger received both her M.P.H. and her PhD from Yale University. Her research is focused on the etiology and prevention of various cancers (including breast and prostate), as well as on osteoporosis. She has served on numerous external review panels for national and international agencies and was the President of the American College of Epidemiology in 2007-2008. In 2010, she received the American College of Epidemiology Award for Leadership and Distinguished Service, and in 2011, the John Hastings Award for Excellence in Service to the University and the Community from the University of Toronto.
 

Jennifer L. Kuk

Jennifer L. Kuk, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at York University and holds funding from the Heart and Stroke Foundation and MITACS-ACCELERATE. Her laboratory is investigating the relationship between obesity and physical inactivity through clinical human intervention studies and epidemiological approaches. In particular, she is interested in the characterization of the metabolically normal but obese subject and is currently working on factors that identify successful weight management in adult and pediatric bariatric patient populations.
“The Ontario Health Study is an exciting opportunity that will allow us to further investigate how lifestyle impacts our health. This will better inform our health guidelines and public health initiatives that are specific for Canadians.”

Andrew Lim

Andrew Lim is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Toronto and is a neurologist with a practice focusing on disorders of sleep and circadian biology. He completed an MD and residency in neurology at the University of Toronto, a clinical sleep fellowship at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and a Master’s Degree in clinical investigation at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Lim’s research is focused on using statistical genetic, neuropathological and epidemiological studies to better understand the genes and neural circuits that regulate individuals’ biological clocks and their sleep, and how disruption of sleep and biological rhythms (as seen in conditions such as insomnia, shift-work and jet-lag) impact individuals’ risks for such common medical disorders as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and stroke.
"In partnership with the people of Ontario, the Ontario Health Study will have a major impact on our understanding of the complex links between our genes, our biological clocks and sleep, and our risk for diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and stroke."

Vincent Lin

Vincent Lin is an Otolaryngologist/Head and Neck Surgeon at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre with a subspecialty focus in otology and neurotology. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto and Associate Scientist at the Sunnybrook Research Institute. Dr. Lin did his medical school training at Queen’s University before completing an otolaryngology residency at the University of Toronto. He completed further training in clinical otology/neurotology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre before embarking on a research fellowship at the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Centre at the University of Washington, Seattle. His clinical focus is on surgical hearing and vestibular disorders, including cochlear implantation, mastoid and middle ear surgery, acoustic neuroma and other lateral skull base tumours. His basic science research focus is on the prevention and regeneration of auditory and vestibular hair cells.
The OHS has the potential to answer many longitudinal questions that we still have on the development, prevalence and impact of hearing and vestibular loss in our population. From this information, we have the potential to dramatically improve the quality of health care we can provide to our patients.

M. Patrice Lindsay

Patrice Lindsay completed her PhD in Health Services Research/Evaluation and Outcomes through Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. She is currently the Director of Performance and Standards for the Canadian Stroke Network and an appointed member of the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Healthcare. Dr. Lindsay leads the development of Stroke Best Practices guidelines for the Canadian Stroke Network and collaborates on related national and international guideline initiatives. She coordinates the creation of several implementation tools and resources to support the best practice uptake. Dr. Lindsay has also developed and implemented a performance measurement framework for stroke care across Canada and is involved in ongoing stroke surveillance and the development of stroke benchmarks. She is currently a Principal Investigator for the Canadian Stroke Report and Chair of a Guidelines International Network task group on performance measurement.
 

Lorraine L. Lipscombe

Lorraine Lipscombe is an Endocrinologist and Research Scientist at Women’s College Hospital and Research Institute. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto. She received her medical degree from McGill University, and underwent training in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Lipscombe also holds a Masters degree in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Toronto. She has a special interest in the relationship between diabetes and breast cancer, and her research is aimed at improving the prevention, care and outcomes for persons with diabetes. Dr. Lipscombe holds a Clinician Scientist Award from the Canadian Diabetes Association/Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and has numerous publications and grants.
 

Muhammad Mamdani

Muhammad Mamdani is the Director of the Applied Health Research Centre, the Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. He is also Associate Professor in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and in the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation of the Faculty of Medicine, where he supervises graduate students and an adjunct Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Prior to joining the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and St. Michael’s Hospital, Dr. Mamdani was a Director of Outcomes Research at Pfizer Global Pharmaceuticals in New York. Dr. Mamdani’s research interests include pharmacoepidemiology, pharmacoeconomics and drug policy. He has published over 200 research studies in peer-reviewed medical journals.
 

Connie Marras

Connie Marras is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Toronto, where she works as a Clinician Scientist researching risk factors for the cause and progression of neurological illnesses, particularly in Parkinson’s disease. She practices neurology at Toronto Western Hospital, where she is a Movement Disorders Specialist. Dr. Marras serves as co-Chair of the Neurology Working Group for the Ontario Health Study.
I am very excited to help make the Ontario Health Study an excellent and unique resource for understanding the determinants of health and disease. With everyone's participation this will be an internationally admired source of health discoveries.

Mario Masellis

Mario Masellis is also an Associate Scientist in the Brain Sciences Program at Sunnybrook Research Institute and a Research Scientist in the Neurogenetics Section at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He completed his M.D. in 2001 and obtained his FRCP(C) in Neurology in 2006. He has completed a clinical research fellowship in Cognitive Neurology. Dr. Masellis is a Clinician Scientist in the Department of Medicine at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and a cognitive neurologist in the Division of Neurology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto treating a variety of cognitive disorders with a particular clinical interest in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson’s disease dementia, corticobasal syndrome, and frontotemporal dementia. His main research area is pharmacogenetics, the study of effects of genetic polymorphism on variability in individuals’ response to medications, with a focus on neurological and psychotropic drugs. Other research interests include linking genetic and epigenetic factors to brain structure and function using neuroimaging. The focus of this translational research is on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, as well as Lewy body and Frontotemporal Dementias. His ultimate goal is the clinical application of genetics and pharmacogenetics to improve diagnosis, clinico-pathological modeling and pharmacotherapy.
“The OHS has a great potential to identify genomic biomarkers of early disease states, so that we may target future disease-modifying therapies at the earliest stages in order to prevent onset or halt progression to the full-blown syndromes.”

Isabelle Massarelli

Isabelle Massarelli is a registered dietitian and has been an employee of Health Canada for the past 17 years. She has extensive experience in food and nutrition consumption surveys, including the Provincial Nutrition Surveys, the Canadian Community Health Surveys and the Canadian Health Measure Surveys. She collaborated in the adaptation of dietary collection tools for use in Canada, including the Automated Multi Pass Method, a self-automated 24-hour recall tool (ASA24) and the Diet History Questionnaire.
 

Robert Maunder

Robert Maunder is a psychiatrist at Mount Sinai Hospital and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto. Dr. Maunder’s clinical work is centered on people with chronic medical illness, particularly gastrointestinal and liver disease. His research is focused on how social and interpersonal determinants of health, especially the quality of close relationships, contribute to health and illness. He has also contributed to the understanding of how extraordinary stressors, such as the 2003 outbreak of SARS, affect healthcare workers and how to enhance healthcare workers' resilience to stress. His research has been supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada.
"Aspects of the environment, our genes and our experiences that determine health interact with each other in very complex ways. The Ontario Health Study provides an extraordinary opportunity to gain a much deeper understanding of these interactions. I am very hopeful that this project will lead to a more personalized view of how each of us maintains our health and adapts to the challenges of illness."

Roger S. McIntyre

Roger S. McIntyre is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto and Head of the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University Health Network in Toronto. Dr. McIntyre is involved in multiple research endeavours primarily aimed at characterizing the association between mood disorders and medical comorbidity. He is a sought-after speaker and is involved extensively in medical education. Dr. McIntyre has received teaching awards from the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychiatry, and has received the joint Canadian Psychiatric Association (CPA)/Council of Psychiatric Continuing Education Award for the Most Outstanding Continuing Education Activity in Psychiatry in Canada. Dr. McIntyre is a contributor to the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments Guidelines for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks and is a reviewer for such journals as the American Journal of Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry and The New England Journal of Medicine.
“The OHS matters largely because for the citizens of Ontario to be competitive in an increasingly global, smaller and flatter world, we need to reduce the incidence and harmful dysfunction associated with chronic illness by identifying preventative, predictive and prognostic factors. With both physical and mental health, the citizens of Ontario are in the best position to be competitive in the current landscape.”

Zul Merali

Zul Merali is President and CEO of the University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research and Scientific Director of the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group (ROHCG). He is a full professor with the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine and Social Sciences and a professor of neuroscience Carleton University. Dr. Merali has published over 200 articles. His research focuses on the impact of stress on brain chemistry and how that may lead to the genesis of mental illness. He is also interested in the interactions between appetitive and aversive events and how that may impart risk or resiliency on mental illness.
“The OHS initiative has the potential of a large-scale platform for medical research and discovery which may be particularly poignant for developing better mental illness prevention and treatment strategies.”

Claude Messier

Claude Messier is a Professor at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Psychology. During his Master’s and PhD thesis, Dr. Messier discovered that ingestion or injection of glucose could improve memory. In 1996, he wrote a review explaining why and how diabetes would be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Fourteen years later, diabetes is recognized as a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Messier has a strong track record of attracting research funding. As a Principal Investigator, he has attracted over $2 million in funding to date. Dr. Messier has authored numerous publications and his work on the impact of glucose and diabetes on memory has been covered in the popular press. He is a review editor for Frontiers in Neuroenergetics. Dr. Messier has served on several committees and he was Chair of the grant review panel of the Alzheimer Society of Canada. He has consulted for Unilever, Danone and the MacArthur Research Network on Socioeconomic Status and Health. He works with TelAsk to develop adapted interactive voice response systems that adapt to the cognitive limitations of older people.
“The key to preventing and treating disease is knowledge. The knowledge contained in the health data of millions of people is very large. The Ontario Health Study will inevitably result in new prevention strategies and treatments of diseases.”

Anthony B. Miller

Anthony B. Miller is Professor Emeritus at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. A physician-epidemiologist, he was a member of the scientific staff of the U.K. Medical Research Council (1962-71), Director of the Epidemiology Unit of the National Cancer Institute of Canada (1971-86), Chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, University of Toronto (1992-96), Special Expert in the Division of Cancer Prevention, U.S. National Cancer Institute (1997), Senior Epidemiologist, International Agency for Research on Cancer (1998-99) and Head, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg (2000-03). Dr. Miller is a consultant to the Division of Cancer Prevention U.S. National Cancer Institute and to the World Health Organization, Co-Chair of the Cancer Risk Management Steering Committee and a member of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer’s Action Council. He is Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Ontario Occupational Cancer Research Centre. Dr. Miller’s research encompasses cancer control, prevention and screening.
“The Ontario Health Study is critical in helping us learn more about the causes and approaches to prevention of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes in Ontario.”

Fiona A. Miller

Fiona A. Miller is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and a member of the Joint Centre for Bioethics at the University of Toronto. She holds a New Investigator Award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, supported by the Institute of Health Services and Policy Research, to explore the commercialization of academic health research from the perspective of health improvement and health care sustainability. Her research program is centered on health technology policy. Screening and diagnostic technologies are a focus for much of Dr. Miller's work, as they provide information in addition to, or instead of, guidance for medical decision-making, posing challenges for technology assessment and functioning as 'complex interventions' in health systems. Maternal and child health context is of particular interest to her.
 

Nadia Minian

Nadia Minian is a Knowledge Translation Specialist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, where she is dedicated to promoting health equity and improving the health of Ontarians by working in collaborative partnerships with the health system, communities, researchers and policy makers. She received her PhD in Developmental Psychology from the Graduate Center, CUNY.
“I was fascinated when I first heard about the Ontario Health Study. Given its goal of studying millions of Ontarians over several decades, it has the potential to improve the health of millions, and decrease health disparities.”

Gordon W. Moe

Gordon Moe obtained his M.D. and internal medicine training from the University of Toronto and cardiology training at Queen’s University. Dr. Moe is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, a Fellow of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology and a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine. He completed his research training at the University of Toronto and Harvard Medical School. He is currently the Director of the Heart Failure Program and Biomarker Laboratory at St. Michael’s Hospital and a professor of medicine at the University of Toronto. He is the Chair of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference in Guidelines of Heart Failure. His research interests include bench and clinical research in heart failure; cardiac remodeling and biomarkers in heart failure; ethnicity and cardiovascular disease.
 

Sutapa Mukherjee

Sutapa Mukherjee is a Respirologist and Sleep Physician at Women’s College Hospital, an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto and a Research Scientist at the Women’s College Research Institute. She relocated to Toronto from Australia in mid-2011. In addition to her position as Clinical Lead of the Ontario Health Study, Dr. Mukherjee is Chair of the OHS Assessment Centre Working Group and Co-Chair of the OHS Sleep Working Group. She received her PhD from the University of Western Australia on the topic of “Gene Therapy of Lung Malignancy,” followed by post-doctoral work at Harvard School of Public Health in Occupational Epidemiology and Biomarkers of Oxidative Injury. Most recently, Dr. Mukherjee’s research interests have focused on sleep epidemiology and she is the Director of the Western Australian Sleep Health Study, a large-scale cohort study of sleep apnea patients.
“I am very excited and proud to be part of the Ontario Health Study, which has tremendous potential to improve our understanding of the common complex diseases that affect our lives, such as cancer, heart disease, sleep apnea, depression and others. This may lead to improved strategies for prevention of disease, better management of diagnosed disease and, ultimately, better quality of life as we age.”

Gary Naglie

Gary Naglie received his medical degree from McGill University, specialty training in Internal Medicine and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Toronto, and graduate training in Clinical Epidemiology at McMaster University. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and the Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, at the University of Toronto and holds the University of Toronto Mary Trimmer Chair in Geriatric Medicine. Dr. Naglie is Chief of the Department of Medicine at Baycrest Geriatric Health Care Centre and is a scientist at Baycrest’s Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied & Evaluative Research Unit and the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. His research focuses on quality of life and health outcomes in older adults with cognitive impairment, dementia and various chronic medical conditions. He is a member of Candrive, which is a national group of multidisciplinary researchers interested in driving safety in older adults.
“This exciting, leading-edge study will help answer numerous important research questions about physical and mental health and quality of life. The more people that participate, the more we will be able to learn.”

Steven Narod

Steven Narod is a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Breast Cancer, a Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto and a Senior Scientist at Women’s College Research Institute, where he leads the Familial Breast Cancer Research Unit. Dr. Narod is well known for his role on the team that identified the BRCA2 gene, that when mutated substantially increases a woman’s risk of breast or ovarian cancer. With more than 500 peer-reviewed publications, he is among the most-cited breast cancer researchers. Dr. Narod has worked in collaboration with 70 centres in a multitude of countries to understand how to assess breast and ovarian cancer risk and to prevent cancer among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations.
I have devoted my career to preventing breast and ovarian cancers by understanding the links to family history and modifiable risk factors, like diet and lifestyle. The data we get from large-scale population-based research studies, like the Ontario Health Study, give us important insights that bring us closer to our ultimate goal – to prevent breast and ovarian cancers.

Yael Ogniewicz

Yael Ogniewicz is a cancer genetic counsellor at Grand River Hospital. She completed an Hons. Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Western Ontario and an M.Sc. in human genetics/genetic counselling from Sarah Lawrence College, NY. She then worked as a clinical and research genetic counsellor in New York. After returning to Toronto in 2009, she joined Dr. Steven Narod and his research team at Women’s College Research Institute, coordinating a study on hereditary cancer.
“With a population-based study as large as the OHS, the possibility for medical research and findings are endless. I am honoured to be part of this research team and am optimistic about the health benefits it will ultimately bring.”

J.B. Orange

J.B. Orange is the Director of the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western University in London, Ontario, and a Professor there. He is an Associate Scientist with the Lawson Health Research Institute in the Aging, Rehabilitation & Geriatric Care Centre at St. Joseph’s Health Care – Parkwood Hospital in London. He is a Research Associate with the Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging at Western. Dr. Orange’s peer-reviewed publications and funded research address language and cognitive-communication disorders of adults and older adults. His research has a special emphasis on discourse and communication of individuals with various forms of dementia. Current research projects include the analyses of language, discourse, and conversation of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, aphasia, frontotemporal lobe dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. On-going studies include communication enhancement education and training programs for family and professional caregivers of individuals with dementia.
“The Ontario Health Study provides a unique opportunity for researchers, clinicians, the lay public and health and social policy makers, among others, to advance our collective understanding of myriad health issues of Ontarians. Moreover, it is anticipated that data from the OHS will help advance the overall effectiveness and efficiency of health programs, and will improve the health-related quality of life of Ontarians.”

Barry Pakes

Barry Pakes is a public health and preventive medicine specialist who trained at McGill, University of Toronto and the Harvard School of Public Health. His tropical medicine training is from the Universidad Cayetano Heredia in Lima. He is Principle Investigator in the “Ethical Analysis in Public Health Practice” project and lectures widely on Global Health Ethics and Social Responsibility in Academic Health Sciences. He is the Founder and Program Director of the Global Health Education Initiative at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and has taught graduate courses there and at the Braun School of Public Health in Jerusalem. Dr. Pakes has also worked as a Senior Fellow at the World Health Organization. He works clinically in primary care, emergency medicine and travel medicine in the Greater Toronto Area and in Northern Ontario. His international experience includes clinical, education and research work in India, Israel, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe. His principle research interests include decision-making frameworks in medicine, vaccinology and medical education.
 

Smita Pakhale

Smita Pakhale is Associate Scientist, Clinical Epidemiology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; Assistant Professor, Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, the University of Ottawa; and a staff physician in the Division of Respiratory Medicine at Ottawa Hospital. Her research interests are chronic lung diseases, quality of life, global health, health equity and social determinants of health.
“The Ontario Health Study is a phenomenal tool not only to deepen our understanding of causes of diseases, but also for causes of the causes. Join the OHS and make a difference, yes we can!”

Guillaume Paré

Guillaume Paré is Assistant Professor of Pathology and Molecular Medicine at McMaster University and Director of the Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Laboratory. Dr. Paré is a Medical Biochemist with board certification from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. He completed a Master’s in Human Genetics at McGill University and trained in genetic epidemiology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Paré currently holds a Canada Research Chair in Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology. In 2010, he received the CIHR Institute of Genetics Maud Menten New Investigators Prize (Clinical). His clinical interests are centered on lipoprotein disorders, obesity and cardiovascular disease prevention.
“The Ontario Health Study is a fantastic scientific endeavour that will improve our health, by Ontarians and for Ontarians, present and future.”

Esteban J. Parra

Esteban J. Parra is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto at Mississauga. He is a Molecular Anthropologist interested in the application of genetic markers in evolutionary and biomedical studies. One of the major topics of Dr. Parra’s research is the identification of genetic risk factors for diabetes, obesity and lipid traits. He has received funding for this research from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre. Dr. Parra has also been involved in a study aimed at evaluating vitamin D status in young adults ofdiverse ancestry in Ontario, a project that was funded by the Natural Sciences and Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Government of Ontario (EarlyResearcher Award).
"Ontario, and particularly the Greater Toronto Area, has an incredibly diverse population. The Ontario Health Study will provide an unparalleled opportunity to explore in detail the genetic and environmental factors associated with disease, and more importantly, the complex ways in which genes and environment interact to influence disease risk."

Tomáš Paus

Tomáš Paus is the Tanenbaum Chair in Population Neuroscience at the University of Toronto and Senior Scientist at the Rotman Research Institute. He is an expert in mapping the human brain in health and disease using a variety of tools, including magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and transcranial magnetic stimulation. In his current research, Professor Paus applies brain-mapping tools in population-based studies investigating the interplay between genes and environment in shaping the adolescent brain and, in turn, cognitive and mental health.
 

Anthony Perruccio

Anthony Perruccio holds a PhD in Epidemiology, and is a Research Scientist in the Arthritis Program, Toronto Western Hospital, and Assistant Professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto. He serves as co-Chair of the OHS Musculoskeletal working group. His research interests focus primarily on osteoarthritis, identifying the impact of this highly prevalent disease on individuals and society. His work also focuses on patient outcomes following surgical management for osteoarthritis.
 

Kathy Pichora-Fuller

Kathy Pichora-Fuller is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto and an Adjunct Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. She worked as a Clinical Audiologist and then the Supervisor of Audiology at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto before completing her PhD in Psychology in 1991. Until 2002, she was on the faculty in the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences and Director of the Institute for Hearing Accessibility Research at the University of British Columbia. She combines her clinical experience in rehabilitative audiology with experimental research on auditory and cognitive aging.
"I’m delighted that measures of hearing will be included in the OHS. Hearing loss is an important topic to include because it is one of the three most common age-related chronic disabilities. Even more importantly, we need to understand more about why people with untreated hearing loss seem to have poorer health outcomes in many other health domains compared to their peers who have good hearing or who have sought treatment for hearing loss."

Ravi Retnakaran

Ravi Retnakaran is an Associate Professor in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the University of Toronto and is a Clinician-Scientist based at the Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. He is a former Robert Turner Visiting Scholar in Diabetes Research at Oxford University. Dr. Retnakaran is a Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator and Canadian Diabetes Association Clinician-Scientist. Dr. Retnakaran’s clinical research program focuses on the early pathophysiology and treatment of type 2 diabetes. A central component of this program is an ongoing prospective cohort study in which a large cohort of women reflecting the full spectrum of glucose tolerance in pregnancy is being followed longitudinally over many years, yielding insights into early events in the natural history of Type 2 diabetes and vascular disease.
“The Ontario Health Study provides an opportunity to learn about the determinants of health and disease, and thereby improve the future health of our society.”

Robert Roberts

Robert Roberts is the President and CEO of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and founding Director of The Ruddy Canadian Cardiovascular Genetics Centre. He received his M.D. from Dalhousie University, completed his residency in Internal Medicine and Fellowship in Cardiology at the University of Toronto. Funded by a Canadian Heart Foundation Scholarship, he pursued research in heart disease and in 1982 became Chief of Cardiology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, where he remained for 23 years. As a Cardiologist, Educator and Scientist, he developed the MCBK Test, which has been used to diagnose heart attacks for the past three decades. Dr. Roberts’ research led him to molecular biology and genetics, during which time he discovered many genes responsible for heart disease. He is generally regarded as one of the founders of molecular cardiology.
 

Isabelle Rondeau

Isabelle Rondeau is a registered dietician and has been an employee of Health Canada for the past nine years. She has extensive experience in food and nutrition consumption surveys. Ms. Rondeau has been involved in the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Health Measure Survey. Recently, she collaborated in the adaption of dietary collection tools for use in Canada, including the Automated Multiple Pass Method, a self-automated 24-hour recall tool and the Diet History Questionnaire.
 

Clodagh M. Ryan

Clodagh Ryan is a Respirologist with a subspecialty interest in sleep medicine. She holds an appointment as an Assistant Professor of medicine at the University of Toronto and is also Assistant Director and Quality Advisor of the Centre for Sleep Health and Research at University Health Network. Dr. Ryan is co-chair of the Ontario Health Study’s sleep working group. She has published several original research papers and review articles on sleep apnea and its treatment.
"The OHS is an exciting opportunity to do the first large epidemiology study of determinants and outcomes of sleep health in a Canadian population. Due to the collaboration and involvement of experts from multiple and diverse fields, this study is unique with far-reaching potential."

Andriy V. Samokhvalov

Andriy V. Samokhvalov is a psychiatrist and clinician-researcher at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. In 2007, he obtained a PhD for his research in clinical phenomenology and treatment outcomes of somatoform disorders. Dr. Samokhvalov’s research interest is in the field of addictions, with the major focus on alcohol use disorders epidemiology, comorbidities and treatment, as well as nicotine and opioid dependence treatment options and outcomes.
 

Gustavo Saposnik

Gustavo Saposnik is a staff neurologist at St. Michael’s Hospital, Director of the Stroke Outcomes Research Unit and Director of the Center for Virtual Reality Studies (CVR) at St. Michael’s Hospital, an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto, and has cross appointments at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. Dr. Saposnik obtained his medical degree from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1990 and obtained his Masters degree in the Clinical Effectiveness Program from the University of Buenos Aires and the Harvard School of Public Health. He has trained in Buenos Aires, the U.S., and Canada. As well, he is the principal investigator of several research projects and grants, and received the HSFO Clinician-Scientist Award. Dr. Saposnik’s research focus is stroke outcomes research.
 

Rita Shahin

Rita Shahin is an Associate Medical Officer of Health with Toronto Public Health and an adjunct Professor with the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Dr. Shahin is responsible for the Sexually Transmitted Infections Case Management Program, the Sexual Health Clinics Program and the Needle Exchange Program at Toronto Public Health.
 

Nicola Shaw

Nicola Shaw is the ESRI Canada Health Informatics Research Chair and Scientific Director, Health Informatics Institute. Dr. Shaw was recruited to Canada in 2003 by the University of British Columbia, where she was a Research Scientist with the Centre for Healthcare Innovation and Improvement at the Child and Family Research Institute in Vancouver. Prior to that, she received her Post-Graduate Certification in Health Research Methods at the University of Central Lancashire, U.K. 2001; PhD Health Informatics (University of Central Lancashire in collaboration with Oxford University Postgraduate Medical Education and Training) 1997; Professional Certificate from the Market Research Society (U.K.) 1995; B.Sc. (Hons) Business Information Systems with Management from the University of Central Lancashire in 1994; and her HND in Business Information Technology from the University of Central Lancashire in 1992. Dr. Shaw is an Expert Advisor to Canada Health Infoway and has just completed her term on the Advisory Board for the Institute of Health Services and Policy Research with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. She currently serves as the Research Chair and Scientific Director of the Health Informatics Institute in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, facilitating significant local, national and international research that enables health system innovation, as well as improved and more efficient patient-centered care.
“I am excited to be associated with a study assuring quality health care through the prevention and treatment of disease. The Ontario Health Study supports my belief in the importance of research, evaluation and sharing of vital information that will contribute to the well-being and overall health of all Ontarians, now and in the future.”

Samir K. Sinha

A passionate advocate for the needs of older persons, Samir K. Sinha is the Director of Geriatrics at Mount Sinai and the University Health Network Hospitals in Toronto. After pursuing his undergraduate medical studies at the University of Western Ontario, he obtained a Masters in Medical History and a Doctorate in Sociology at the University of Oxford’s Institute of Ageing. Dr. Sinha is a Rhodes Scholar. After postgraduate training in Internal Medicine at the University of Toronto, he went on to the U.S. where he most recently served as the Erickson/Reynolds Fellow in Clinical Geriatrics, Education and Leadership at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Sinha’s breadth of training has contributed to his expertise in health policy and the delivery of services related to the care of the elderly. He has consulted with health authorities in Britain, Canada, the U.S. and China about the implementation and administration of unique, integrated and innovative models of geriatric care that reduce disease burden, improve access and capacity and ultimately promote health.
“The Ontario Health Study’s Aging Study matters to me because I know it will make a significant contribution to support Ontarians living longer and living well.”

Walter Siqueira

Walter Siqueira is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Dentistry and Biochemistry in the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario. His background includes a D.D.S. from Santo Amaro University, a PhD from University of Sao Paulo and a postdoctoral research fellowship at Boston University. Dr. Siqueira’s background as both a dental clinician and basic scientist has enabled him to easily integrate basic science with applied clinical research and promote translational research. He is considered an authority in the salivary research field. Dr. Siqueira leads a nationally unique research program aimed at determining how the saliva and the salivary components affect oral and systemic health. Dr. Siqueira is also a Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator.
 

Allan R. Slomovic

Allan R. Slomovic is the Research Director of the Cornea/External Disease Service at the Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network. He is the Chairperson for Continuing Professional Development for the Canadian Ophthalmologic Society and past chairperson of the Canadian Cornea Society. He is an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Slomovic obtained a Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Montreal and completed his residency at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Slomovic was awarded Fellowship programs at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami in Cornea/External Ocular Diseases and Laser Microsurgery. Dr. Slomovic has been involved in teaching for many years, including serving as the program Director for Ophthalmology for the University of Toronto from 1991-2001 and training 30 fellows in Cornea/External Ocular Diseases of the Eye from Canada, the U.S., Israel, Australia, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Great Britain. In 2001, Dr. Slomovic was awarded the Mentor of the Year Award by the Royal College of Physicians of Canada. Dr. Slomovic has published numerous articles in the area of Cornea/External Diseases of the Eye and Refractive Surgery and has also lectured internationally.
“This is a unique opportunity to obtain important information regarding health determinants in the province of Ontario. The implications for patient-centered health care delivery and research are far-reaching.”

Julia Spaniol

Julia Spaniol is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Ryerson University, where she directs the Memory and Decision Processes Lab. Dr. Spaniol earned a PhD in cognitive psychology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and completed postdoctoral work at Duke University Medical Center and at the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest. Dr. Spaniol uses behavioural and neuroimaging approaches to investigate age-related changes in cognition. She is especially interested in the impact of reward motivation on memory and decision making in younger and older adults.
“As a cognitive psychologist, I am thrilled to have an opportunity to contribute to the OHS. Brain health and cognitive vitality are critical at every age. Given the increase in life expectancy, it is imperative that we understand how cognitive functioning changes over the lifespan, and how it relates to other aspects of health.”

Duncan Stewart

Duncan Stewart is the CEO and Scientific Director of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, as well as an active cardiologist and scientist focusing on developing new regenerative therapies for cardiovascular disease. Dr. Stewart has made a number of important discoveries about the endothelial cells that line our blood vessels, including elucidating the important roles of the endothelial factors endothelin-1 and nitric oxide in vascular disease. He also initiated Canada’s first clinical trials using gene therapy for therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with advanced coronary artery disease and gene-enhanced progenitor cell therapy for pulmonary hypertension. More recently, he has been investigating gene and cell therapy approaches for myocardial infarction and acute respiratory distress syndrome.
 

Stephen C. Strother

Stephen C. Strother studied Physics and Mathematics at Auckland University and received a PhD in Electrical Engineering from McGill University in 1986. After a fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, Professor Strother joined the VA Medical Center in Minneapolis as Senior PET Physicist and the University of Minnesota, where he became Professor of Radiology. In 2004, he moved to Toronto as a Senior Scientist at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, where he is Associate Site Leader at the multi-institutional Centre for Stroke Recovery, and Professor of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. His research interests include neuroinformatics, with a focus on PET and fMRI neuroimaging techniques for research and clinical applications applied to the aging brain. He is a cofounder of Predictek, Inc., in Chicago, a medical analysis and diagnostic company, an Associate Editor for Human Brain Mapping, a member of the Neurotechnology Review Committee and a past chairman of an international Neuroinformatics Standards Committee at the National Institutes of Health, U.S.A.
“The OHS solves one of the most difficult problems facing researchers using specialized neuroimaging techniques to study the aging and diseased brain. It will allow targeting of such studies to larger groups with unprecedented information on the participants population health status. This is likely to accelerate scientific discovery and translation to new and more effective clinical treatments.”

Howard C. Tenenbaum

Howard C. Tenenbaum is a Professor of Periodontology and was Head of that discipline for eight years at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto. He was Associate Dean for Biological and Diagnostic Sciences for six years. Dr. Tenenbaum is a cross-appointed Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, U of T, and is Head of the Division of Research in the Department of Dentistry at Mount Sinai Hospital. As well, Dr. Tenenbaum serves as an FDA panel member for Dental Devices and Drugs (U.S.) and is Vice-Chair of the Federal Dental Care Advisory Committee (Canada). He is the Graduate Coordinator for the Faculty of Dentistry School of Graduate Studies Division. Dr. Tenenbaum has a D.D.S. from the University of Toronto and completed his specialty in periodontology as well as a PhD in bone cell biology. Dr. Tenenbaum has Fellowships from the Royal College of Dentists of Canada, the International College of Dentists and the Academy of Dentistry International. Dr. Tenenbaum has received research funding from the Medical Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and other agencies for 25 years and has pursued ongoing research in the fields of periodontics, orofacial pain and bone cell biology (including a series of bone cell studies aboard the Space Shuttle carried out by Senator John Glenn). He has published over 140 articles, book chapters and abstracts in scientific and clinical journals and has lectured nationally and internationally.
“I am terribly excited about the opportunity to work closely with my medical and other health professions colleagues. Given the emerging and increasingly robust data demonstrating the relationships between oral health and general well-being and health, I believe this study will provide unique data that can help us to understand these relationships in a manner not possible until now. With this information, I am certain that greater understanding of oral and non-oral diseases, especially infectious and inflammatory diseases and also chronic pain conditions, will lead to more rational preventive and treatment approaches to these and other disorders.”

Graham E. Trope

Graham E. Trope is Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Toronto. He has directed the Glaucoma Service at University Health Network since 1984. He is the past Chairman of Ophthalmology at the University of Toronto and past Ophthalmologist in Chief at University Health Network. Dr. Trope has published over 165 scientific articles. He has been involved in glaucoma research and treatment for over 30 years and is the Founder and Scientific Director of the Glaucoma Research Society of Canada. He is the past Editor in Chief of the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. Dr. Trope is a winner of the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons Council Award for his contributions to patient care. Dr. Trope has trained 30 glaucoma fellows from around the world and is a past examiner for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. He is a member of a number of ophthalmology societies and has published two books, Glaucoma, A patient’s guide to the disease and Glaucoma Surgery.
 

Jack Tu

Jack Tu is the Program Leader for the Cardiovascular Research Group and a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). An attending physician in the Division of Cardiology at the Sunnybrook Schulich Heart Centre, Dr. Tu is also a Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. He holds a Canada Research Chair in Health Services Research and is a Career Investigator of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Dr. Tu, chair of the OHS cardiovascular working group, specializes in cardiovascular outcomes research, aimed at measuring and improving the quality of health care delivery in Canada.
"Cardiovascular disease (including stroke) kills approximately 1 in every 3 Canadians. The information gathered from the OHS will enable us to significantly reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease for future generations of Canadians."

Karen Urbanowski

Karen Urbanoski is an Independent Scientist in the Social and Epidemiological Research Group at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. She obtained her doctorate from the Dalla Lana School of Public Health in 2010. Dr. Urbanoski recently spent 2 years as a researcher and instructor at the Center for Addiction Medicine at Harvard Medical School, after working in research at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health from 2002 through 2009. Her research interests focus on the social epidemiology of substance use and addiction, particularly mechanisms of aetiology, recovery and processes of help-seeking for addiction-related problems.
 

Pascal Van Lieshout

Pascal van Lieshout is a Professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Toronto, a Canada Research (II) in Oral Motor Function, and Director of the Oral Dynamics Lab. He also holds cross-appointments in Psychology, the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, the Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science and the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. His area of interest is in oral motor control, studying the mechanisms that may promote or impede stability in movement coordination and fluency in a variety of populations, including people who stutter and individuals with Parkinson disease.
"Knowledge can change the world and nowhere is this more apparent than in health care. The ability to collect this much information on health and well-being from people in Ontario will allow researchers and clinicians to identify major challenges individuals experience in achieving healthy lifestyles and retain or regain the ability to be effective communicators to share their stories with family, friends and caregivers."

George A. Wells

George A. Wells is a Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the University of Ottawa and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. He is also a Professor in the Department of Medicine and a Senior Investigator at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute at The Ottawa Hospital. His research interests are in the design and analysis of clinical trials, statistical methodology related to health care delivery, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, economic evaluations and the development and assessment of decision support technologies for patients and practitioners. Dr. Wells has worked extensively with national and international government and non-government research organizations, as well as private pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. He has been on the executive and steering committees of national and international research programs, external safety and efficacy monitoring committees, scientific grant review committees, editorial committees and scientific advisory committees. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology and on the Editorial Committee of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
 

Albert Wong

Albert Wong is a neuroscientist and psychiatrist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He attended medical school at the University of Toronto, where he completed specialty training in psychiatry and a PhD in neurobiology. Dr. Wong’s lab uses rodent models to investigate the genetic and cellular basis of psychosis, and his area of clinical expertise is schizophrenia.
“Detailed prospective epidemiological studies such as the OHS are crucial to obtain high-quality data on disease risk. Such information can provide valuable insights about etiology and preventative interventions.”

Bernard Zinman

Bernard Zinman is Director of the Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes and holds the Sam and Judy Pencer Family Chair in Diabetes Research at Mount Sinai Hospital and the University of Toronto. He is Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto and Senior Scientist at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital. Dr. Zinman was Director of the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre (1993-2000) and is involved with diabetes care and research at both national and international levels. His main research interests include the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus, the development of new therapies for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, diabetes in Aboriginal communities, and studies directed at the prevention of diabetes.
“The Ontario Health Study provides an incredible opportunity to determine the health status of Canadians as well as an incredible research platform to address major heath questions.”

OHS Committees and Scientific Working Groups


OHS Executive

Vivek Goel, Public Health Ontario

Tom Hudson, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Michael Sherar, Cancer Care Ontario


Scientific Steering Committee

Julian Little, University of Ottawa

Jack Tu, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Craig Earle, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Nancy Kreiger, University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health; Cancer Care Ontario

Lorraine Lipscombe, Women's College Hospital

Muhammad Mamdani, St. Michael's Hospital

Sutapa Mukherjee, Women's College Hospital

Tomas Paus, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Peter Selby, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health


Ethics Advisory Committee

Ann Heesters, Toronto Rehab

Karey Iron, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Jaro Kotalik, Lakehead University

Nancy Kreiger, University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health; Cancer Care Ontario

Trudo Lemmens, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law

Kelly McDonald, Ontario Health Study

Jeff Nisker, University of Western Ontario, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry; Coordinator of Health Ethics & Humanities

Lisa Schwartz, McMaster University

Ross Upshur, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Alison Van Nie, Privacy and Ethics Officer, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Don Willison (Chair), Public Health Ontario

Claudia Emerson, McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health


Operational Committees

Assessment Centre

Craig Earle, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Sutapa Mukherjee (Chair), Women's College Hospital

Zdenka Pausova, Hospital for Sick Children

Ravi Retnakaran, Sinai Centre for Diabetes, University of Toronto

Jack Tu, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences


Clinic-based Recruitment

Geoff Anderson, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Craig Earle (Chair), Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Doris Howell, Princess Margaret Hospital

Sarwar Hussain, Center for Addiction and Mental Health

Sepideh Kamali, Sunnybrook Hospital

Geoffrey Liu, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network

Karen Molyneux, University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Sutapa Mukherjee, Women's College Hospital

Patricia O’Farrell, University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Devalben Patel, Princess Margaret Hospital

Angela Robertson, Women’s College Hospital

Heather Sherrard, University of Ottawa Heart Institute


Laboratory

Samantha Hodgins, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Abi Oduwole, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital

Teresa Selander, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital

Muhammed Siddiqui, Public Health Ontario

Ron Weingust, Public Health Ontario


Questionnaire

Laura Anderson, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Elizabeth Badley (Co-Chair), University of Toronto

Arlene Bierman, St. Mike's Hospital, University of Toronto

Jane Irvine, Toronto General Hospital, York University

Julia Knight, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Nancy Kreiger, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Julian Little (Co-Chair), University of Ottawa

Sutapa Mukherjee, Women's College Hospital

Tomas Paus, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest


Scientific Working Groups

Aboriginal Health

Greg Ross, Northern Ontario School of Medicine


Aging/Gerontology

Arlene Bierman (Chair), St. Mike's Hospital, University of Toronto

Cheryl Grady, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Vanita Jassal, University Health Network, University of Toronto

Nancy Kreiger, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Gary Naglie, Baycrest

Samir Sinha, Mount Sinai Hospital


Audiology/ENT/ Speech Language Pathology

Peter Alberti, University of Toronto

Prudence Allen, University of Western Ontario

Megan Cheesman, University of Western Ontario

Sharon Cushing, Hospital for Sick Children

Luc De Nil, University of Toronto

Katya Feder, Formerly Statistics Canada (worked on CHMS cycle 3)

Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, University of Ottawa

Robert Harrison (Chair), Hospital for Sick Children

Vincent Lin, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Rosemary Martino, University of Toronto

J.B. Orange, University of Western Ontario

Kathy Pichora-Fuller, University of Toronto

Elizabeth Rochon, University of Toronto

David R Schramm, University of Ottawa

Susan Scollie, University of Western Ontario

Susan Stanton, University of Western Ontario

Sandra Trehub, University of Toronto

Pascal Van Lieshout, University of Toronto

Stacey Weber, Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Richard Welland, Brock University


Cancer

Shabbir Alibhai, Canadian Cancer Society, University Health Network

Eitan Amir, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network

Geoff Anderson, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Nancy Baxter, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto

Sean Cleary, University Health Network

Michelle Cotterchio, Cancer Care Ontario, Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Craig Earle (Chair), Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Ophira Ginsburg, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Women's College Hospital

Rayjean Hung, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Julia Knight, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Nancy Kreiger, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

John McLaughlin, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, UofT

Steve Narod, Women's College Hospital

Paula Rochon, Women's College Hospital

Harman Sekhon, Ottawa Hospital Research Iinstitute

John Srigley, Credit Valley Hospital, McMaster University

David Urbach, Toronto General Hospital/University Health Network

Martin Yaffe, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, UofT


Cardiovascular Disease

Sonia Anand, McMaster University

Sacha Bhatia, University of Toronto

Vince Bowman, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario

Chi-Ming Chow, St. Michael's Hospital

Sulan Dai, Public Health Agency of Canada

Michael Farkouh, University of Toronto

Milan Gupta, McMaster University

Paula Harvey, Women's College Hospital

Jane Irvine, Toronto General Hospital, York University

Doug Lee, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Thomas Lindsay, University Health Network

Peter Liu, University Health Network

Doug Manuel, Ottawa Health Research Institute

Paul McDonald, University of Waterloo

Gordon Moe, St. Michael's Hospital

Robert Nolan, Toronto General Research Institute

Sophia Papadakis, Ottawa Heart Institute

Guillaume Pare, McMaster University

John Parker, University Health Network

Rob Petrella, University of Western Ontario

Dan Purdham, Cardiac Care Network of Ontario

Bob Roberts, Ottawa Heart Institute

Robert Ross, Queen's University

Gustavo Saposnik, St. Michael's Hospital, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Duncan Stewart, Ottawa Health Research Institute

Jack Tu (Interim Chair), Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Subodh Verma, St. Michael’s Hospital

George A. Wells, Ottawa Heart Institute


Cognition

Nicole Anderson, Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit, Baycrest Centre

Sandra Black, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Patrick Davidson, University of Ottawa

Stanka Fitneva, Queen's University

Barry Greenberg, Toronto Western Research Institute

Lynn Hasher, Rotman Research Institute; University of Toronto

Brian Levine (Chair), Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Mary Pat McAndrews, Toronto Western Hospital

Claude Messier, University of Ottawa

Natasha Rajah, McGill University

Sean Rourke, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Unviersity of Toronto

Julia Spaniol, Ryerson University

Lisa Sweet, Bruyere Continuing Care

Mary Tierney, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre


Community Measures

Roy Cameron, University of Waterloo

Susan Elliott, University of Waterloo

Nancy Kreiger, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Scott Leatherdale (Interim Chair), Cancer Care Ontario, University of Waterloo

William Mackillop, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Queen's University

Todd Norwood, Cancer Care Ontario

Jennifer Robertson-Wilson, Wilfrid Laurier University


Endocrinology - Diabetes

Gillian Booth, St. Michael's Hospital

Phil Connelly, St. Michael's Hospital

Hertzel Gerstein, McMaster University

Tony Hanley, University of Toronto

Stewart Harris, University of Western Ontario

Robyn Houlden, Kingston General Hospital

Irene Hramiak, St. Joseph's Health Centre (London)

Erin Keely, Queen's University

Lorraine Lipscombe (Co-Chair), Women's College Hospital

Louise Maple-Brown, Mount Sinai Hospital

Esteban Parra, University of Toronto

Ravi Retnakaran, Sinai Centre for Diabetes, University of Toronto

Baiju Shah, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Jovita Sundaramoorthy, Canadian Diabetes Association

Bernard Zinman (Co-Chair), Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto


Endocrinology - Reproductive Health

Gerald Bain, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto

Jon Barrett, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Marcus Bernardini, University Health Network

Jennifer Blake (Interim Chair), Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Alan Bocking, Mount Sinai Hospital

Theodore Brown, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto

Denice Feig, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto

Julian Little, University of Ottawa

Nadia Minian, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Beth Potter, University of Ottawa


Ethics, Legal and Social Issues

Claudia Emerson, McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health

Shane Green, McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health

Ann Heesters, Toronto Rehab

Jaro Kotalik, Lakehead University

Nancy Kreiger (Chair), Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Fiona Miller, University of Toronto

Ubaka Ogbogu, University of Toronto

Barry Pakes, University of Toronto

Lisa Schwartz, McMaster University

Michael Szego, University of Toronto

Ross Upshur, University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics

Don Willison, Public Health Ontario


Environmental Measures

Alison Bested, Environmental Health Clinic, Women's College Hospital

Riina Bray, Environmental Health Clinic, Women's College Hospital

Ray Copes (Co-Chair), Public Health Ontario

Paul Demers, Occupational Cancer Research Centre, Cancer Care Ontario

Shelley Harris, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Kathleen Kerr, Environmental Health Clinic, Women's College Hospital

Lynn Marshall, Environmental Health Clinic, Women's College Hospital

Cam Mustard (Co-Chair), Institute for Work and Health

Crystal Palleschi, Lambton County

Len Ritter, University of Guelph


Genomics/Molecular Epidemiology

Joseph Beyene, McMaster University

Nick Birkett, University of Ottawa

Michael Conlon, Sudbury Regional Hospital

Michelle Cotterchio, Cancer Care Ontario, Dalla Lana School of Public Health

France Gagnon, Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Steve Gallinger, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Aaron Goldman, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

James Gomes, University of Ottawa

Allison Hazell, Medcan Clinic

Rayjean Hung (Co-Chair), Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Julia Knight, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Julian Little (Co-Chair), University of Ottawa

Geoffrey Liu, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network

Jenna McCuaig, Familial Breast and Ovarian Cancer Clinic, Princess Margaret Hospital

Yael Ogniewicz, Women's College Hospital

Guillaume Pare, McMaster University

Andrew Paterson, Hospital for Sick Children

Kathy Siminovitch, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Ingeborg Zehbe, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre


Health Economics

Jeffrey Hoch (Chair), St. Michael's Hospital, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Feng Xie, McMaster University


Health Informatics

Chi-Ming Chow (Chair), St. Michael's Hospital

Khaled El Emam, University of Ottawa

Gunther Eysenbach, University of Toronto

Trevor Jamieson, St. Michael's Hospital

Rino LaGrassa, Applied Health Research Centre, St. Michael’s Hospital

Rob Naccarato, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Nikki Shaw, Algoma University

David Sutton, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research


Health Promotion, Prevention and Screening

Anna Chiarelli, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Eva Grunfeld, Universtiy of Toronto, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

John McLaughlin, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, University of Toronto

Mary Tierney, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre


Health Services and Data Linkage

Geoff Anderson (Co-chair), University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Marie-Helene Chomienne, University of Ottawa

Craig Earle, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

David Henry (Co-chair), Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Anifa Luyinga-Kalay, University of Ottawa

Paula Rochon, Women's College Hospital

Peggy Sloan, Cancer Care Ontario


Imaging

Sandra Black, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Aaron Fenster, Robarts Research Institute

Cheryl Grady, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Simon Graham, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Tomas Paus (Chair), Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Zdenka Pausova, Hospital for Sick Children

Stephen Strother, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Aristotle Voineskos, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Martin Yaffe, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre


Infectious Disease

Ann Burchell, McGill University

Curtis Cooper, Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Ottawa Hospital

Natasha Crowcroft (Chair), Public Health Ontario

Nick Daneman, Sunnybrook Research Institute

Shelley Deeks, Public Health Ontario

Eleanor Fish, Toronto General Research Institute

Wayne Gold, Toronto General Research Institute

Effie Gournis, Toronto Public Health

Jenny Heathcote, Toronto Western Research Institute

Frances Jamieson, Public Health Ontario

Jeff Kwong, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Tony Mazzulli, Mount Sinai Hospital

Allison McGeer, Mount Sinai Hospital

Matthew Muller, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto

Elizabeth Rea, Toronto Public Health

Hemant Shah, Toronto Western Research Institute

Rita Shahin, Toronto Public Health

Morris Sherman, Toronto General Research Institute

Barbara Yaffe, Toronto Public Health


Internal Medicine

Sasha Bernatsky, McGill University

Amit Garg, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario

Alexander Logan, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute


Musculoskeletal/Bone Health

Elizabeth Badley (Chair), University of Toronto

Angela Cheung, Toronto General Hospital

Guy Faulkner, University of Toronto

Gillian Hawker, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto

Susan Jaglal, University of Toronto

Nancy Kreiger, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Anthony Perruccio, University Health Network


Neurology

Danielle Andrade, University Health Network, University of Toronto

Sandra Black, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Jorge Burneo, London Health Sciences Centre

Leanne Casaubon, University Health Network

Angela Colantonio, University of Toronto

Jan Willem Gorter, McMaster University

Barry Greenberg, Toronto Western Research Institute

David Grimes, Ottawa Hospital

David Howse, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre

Hans Katzberg, University of Toronto

Brian Levine, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Patrice Lindsay, Canadian Stroke Network

Connie Marras, University of Toronto

Mario Masellis, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Rick Riopelle, ON Neurotrauma Foundation

Gustavo Saposnik, St. Michael's Hospital, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Antonio Strafella, University Health Network

Rick Swartz, University of Toronto Stroke Program


Nutrition

Bertine Akouamba, CARTaGENE

Johane Allard, Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto

Bianca Arendt, Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto

Beatrice Boucher, Cancer Care Ontario

Michelle Cotterchio, Cancer Care Ontario, Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Ilona Csizmadi, Alberta Health Services

Ahmed El-Sohemy, University of Toronto

Teri Emrich, University of Toronto

Tony Hanley, University of Toronto

Meera Jain, Ministry of Health and Long Term Care

Vicki Kirsh, Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto

Anita Koushik, CARTaGENE

Mary L'Abbe, University of Toronto

Isabelle Masserelli, Health Canada

John McLaughlin, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, University of Toronto

Anthony Miller (Chair), University of Toronto

Isabelle Rondeau, Health Canada


Obesity and Physical Activity

Chris Ardern, York University

Eric Doucet, University of Ottawa

Christine Friedenreich, Alberta Health Services

Julia Knight (Chair), Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

Jennifer Kuk, York University

Roger McIntyre, University Health Network

John Spence, University of Alberta

Mary Tierney, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre


Oral Health

Amir Azarpazhooh, University of Toronto

Dennis Cvitkovitch (Chair), University of Toronto

Patricia Main, University of Toronto

David Mock, Unversity of Toronto

Carlos Quiñonez, University of Toronto

Walter Siqueira, University of Western Ontario

Sunjay Suri, University of Toronto

Howard Tenenbaum, University of Toronto


Ophthalmology

Catherine Birt, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Ralf Buhrmann, Ottawa Hospital

Rob Campbell, Queen's University

Stuart Coupland, University of Ottawa, Eye Institute

John Flanagan, University of Waterloo

Thomas Freddo, University of Waterloo

John Gonder, University of Western Ontario

Keith Gordon, CNIB

Sanjoy Gupta, Thunder Bay

John Harvey, McMaster University

Elise Heon, Hospital for Sick Children

William Hodge (Chair), University of Western Ontario

Bernard Hurley, University of Ottawa, Eye Institute

Cindy Hutnik, University of Western Ontario

Yaping Jin, University of Toronto

Peter Kertes, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Jeff Martow, Markham Stouffvile Hospital

Rejean Munger, Ottawa Hospital

Barbara Robinson, University of Waterloo

Francie Si, University of Western Ontario

Allan Slomovic, University of Toronto

Graham Trope, University of Toronto


Pharmacoepidemiology

Muhammad Mamdani (Chair), St. Michael's Hospital

Mario Masellis, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre


Psychosocial and Mental Health

Michael Bagby, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Pierre Cote, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto

Jeff Daskalakis, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Sherry Grace, Toronto General Hospital, York University

Alexander Greer, Mental Health Foundation of Ontario

Jane Irvine (Chair), Toronto General Hospital, York University

James Kennedy, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Bob Mann, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Robert Maunder, Mount Sinai Hospital

Roger McIntyre, University Health Network

Zul Merali, Institute of Mental Health Research

Daniel Mueller, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Sam Noh, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Robert Nolan, University Health Network

Jeurgen Rehm, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Bob Reid, Ottawa Heart Institute

Paul Ritvo, Cancer Care Ontario, York University

Andriy Samokhvalov, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Peter Selby, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Brenda Toner, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Karen Urbanoski, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

imone Vigod, Women's College Hospital

Aristotle Voineskos, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Albert Wong, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine University of Toronto

Lorne Zon, Canadian Mental Health Association


Respiratory

Shawn Aaron, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Ken Chapman, Toronto Western Research Institute

Lisa Cicutto, National Jewish Health; University of Colorado

Anna Day, Women's College Hospital

Andrea Gershon, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

John Granton (Chair), Toronto General Hospital

Chris Licskai, St. Joseph's Health Centre, London

Dianne Lougheed, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences – Kingston, Queens University, Kingston General Hospital

Carole Madeley, Ontario Lung Association

Jennifer Olajos-Clow, Queen's University, Kingston General Hospital

Smita Pakhalé, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute Division of Respiratory Medicine

Clodagh Ryan, Toronto General Hospital

Art Slutsky, St. Michael's Hospital

Matthew Stanbrook, University Health Network

Teresa To, The Hospital for Sick Children


Sleep

Douglas Bradley, Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto

David Klein, St. Michael's Hospital

Andrew Lim, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Sutapa Mukherjee (Co-chair), Women's College Hospital

Clodagh Ryan (Co-chair), University Health Network


Statistics and Methodology

Khaled El Emam, University of Ottawa

William Hodge, University of Western Ontario

Peggy Sloan, Cancer Care Ontario


Urology

Tony Bella, University of Ottawa

Rod Breau, University of Ottawa